A Look at Some Important Upgrades for Your Fixie

Well, buying a fixie bike, or any bike for that matter, isn’t something of a ‘set and forget’ thing. At some point, you would realize you can get more out of your fixie, and would want to upgrade it.

This realization may or may not be “real”, but having the best version of your bike that you can would always involve upgrading it – many times more than once.

So let you guide you through some of the most common, and most important upgrades that you can consider for your fixie bike.

Wheelset

If you’re looking to “transform” your fixie rather than just do a minor upgrade, you would want to consider upgrading the wheelset. It’s the most expensive upgrade, and only getting a new bike is going to cost you more than it.

That said, even if you’re on a budget, you would want something that comes with aluminum rims and sealed bearing hubs. Some of the important features to look out for include the weight, reliability and durability. As it’s going to be quite an expensive upgrade, it should at least last long enough to make it worthwhile.

Deep-dish aero rims are apparently one of the most popular types of wheelsets, but they are not the most durable and can be more expensive and difficult to repair. You would probably be much better off with the basic box-section ones; they typically don’t come with any of the said issues and are probably also more durable and practical.

Saddle

This seems to be one of the most common upgrades bike owners like to make. However, we think you shouldn’t be upgrading the saddle just for the sake of it, but only if you don’t find it comfortable enough.

Also, unlike what many do, we don’t recommend that you look for only the style factor; you would hate yourself for doing so if there’s no comfort. You can simply try out a few different seats to figure out which one fits the bill perfectly for you, especially in terms of comfort.

Pedals

Just like saddles, pedals are largely a matter of personal preference. This is the reason many bikes don’t even come with a pedal, as the manufacturers are aware that many buyers would simply use something they like. Some bikes, however, do come with a basic pedal.

When you’re out in the market looking for the right pedal for your bike, you would actually have quite a few options. The clipless pedals seem to be quite a rage lately, as they are challenging but very efficient, offering a great foot to pedal connection.

Caged pedals that come with a strap have apparently been one of the most popular options from a long time now, as they are believed to be classy and cool.

Finally, the ones with a large strap and freestyle nature are available in plenty of types and styles, and they usually make for a good fun ride.

Tires

Unlike the other upgrades discussed above, upgrading your tire is more about the size than anything else. The standard size is considered to be a width of 23c.

If you’re into serious biking stuff, you may want to consider 28c, though 25c tires usually turns out to be just good enough for pretty much everything.

John Seager
 

John Seager is the Editor of Bikeeo.com. Who is a Bike enthusiast and love to share what he know about this field. In personal life he is a father of a lovely girl and a beloved husband. He loves to go on city trips and spent some time on a bike to discover a new city.

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